Category: juice

Frozen Painkiller!From A Woman’s Drink: Bold R…

Frozen Painkiller!

From A Woman’s Drink: Bold Recipes for Bold Women by Natalka Burian and Scott Schneider

1 1⁄4 cups [300 ml] rum
4 oz [120 ml] coconut cream
2 oz [60 ml] freshly squeezed orange juice
1 1⁄4 cups [300 ml] pineapple juice
1 tsp ground nutmeg, plus a pinch for garnish
3 cups ice

Serves 5 to 6

Put all of these ingredients (except the ice) in a blender and blend on high until the mixture is combined. 

Add the ice, and blend until it’s uniformly thick and smooth.

To garnish, sprinkle with a light layer of nutmeg.

Photo: Alice Gao / Courtesy of Chronicle Books

Skinny Rosewater Pomegranate Champagne Cockt…

Skinny Rosewater Pomegranate Champagne Cocktail by Molly !

Ingredients

½ Bottle Light Pomegranate Juice (2 oz) – I’m using Bai Ipanema Pomegranate*

½ Bottle Champagne (3 oz) – chilled **

1 Tbsp RoseWater – any brand ***

1 Tbsp Pure Lemon Juice – optional

2 Tbsp Glass Rimming Sugar-Salty Mix – optional

Instructions

  1. Rim the champagne glasses (optional).
  2. In a cocktail shaker, add pomegranate juice, lemon juice, rosewater and shake to mix everything.
  3. Pour this mix into the champagne glasses.
  4. Pour champagne over it and serve immediately.

Notes

* Bai Ipanema Pomegranate – is all natural and extremely light. Just 5 calorie / serving. you can use any light juice/ pomegranate infused drink with less calorie

** Champagne – if you want, you can substitute with any bubbly or sparkling wine.

*** RoseWater – if not available, use rose wine

Mulled Wine !

Mulled Wine !

Ingredients

  • 4 cups apple cider
  • 1 (750-ml) bottle red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 orange, zested and juiced
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 3 star anise
  • 4 oranges, peeled, for garnish

Directions

Combine the cider, wine, honey, cinnamon sticks, zest, juice, cloves and star anise in a large saucepan, bring to a boil and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Pour into mugs, add an orange peel to each and serve.

Ina Garten, All Rights Reserved

Blueberry Gin Mojito

Blueberry Gin Mojito

Clap fresh mint together (about 6 – 8 leaves) and add to a cocktail glass
Then add;
3 blueberries and muddle
½ lime (squeezed) and 25ml sugar syrup
Fill ¾ full with crushed ice, add;
Apple juice to the level of ice, and stir
50ml of preferred Gin
25ml Blueberry syrup
Stir again, before topping with crushed ice
Garnish with lime and fresh mint

Get Lucky Created by: Scott Teague, 2013, Death & Co3…

Get Lucky Created by: Scott Teague, 2013, Death & Co

3 blackberries
2 oz. Flor de Caña extra-dry white rum
¾ oz. lemon juice
¼ oz. ginger syrup
¼ oz. orgeat syrup
¼ oz. acacia honey syrup
Peychaud’s bitters, to garnish

In a pilsner glass, gently muddle the blackberries. 

Fill the glass with crushed ice. In a shaker, whip the remaining ingredients, shaking with a few pieces of crushed ice just until incorporated. 

Strain into the glass. 

Garnish with a thin layer of bitters and serve with a straw.

Strange Brew !2 oz. Tanqueray No. Ten gin¾ oz. velvet…

Strange Brew !

2 oz. Tanqueray No. Ten gin
¾ oz. velvet falernum
1 oz. pineapple juice
½ oz. lemon juice
Green Flash IPA
1 mint sprig, to garnish

Short shake all the ingredients (except the IPA) with three ice cubes, then strain into a pilsner glass filled with crushed ice. Top with IPA. Garnish with the mint sprig and serve with a straw.

Snow Don’t Fall by Brittney Olsen (Los…

Snow Don’t Fall by Brittney Olsen (Los Angeles)

Ingredients:

  • Bombay Sapphire
  • Shiitake curaçao
  • Lime juice
  • Cantaloupe/Coconut Water Puree

Brittney Olsen inverted how the cocktail is served. In her reinvention, it’s suspended above the garnish. The result, with contrasting colors and flavors, is nothing short of modern art.

The Green Ghost cocktail

So, you like a gin and tonic but want something a bit more interesting?

First appearing in the 1937 Cafe Royal cocktail book, this is quite a mystery of a drink attributed to a Mr J.B. Hurrel. It’s one of those rare Gin drinks which really needs a good shake in order to be palatable, adds a nice amount of icy water to the potent ingredients. Don’t believe me about the potency? Here’s the recipe.

Recipe

2 ounces Gin

½ ounce Green Chartreuse

½ ounce fresh lime juice (Equivalent to 1 lime).

Yup, not for the uninitiated who believe Smirnoff ice to be strong. In terms of decoration don’t bother. I love the colour of this drink, and anything on the top would detract from that in my opinion. If you add anything, make it a clean piece of twisted lime peel, just don’t go mad with sticks (or god forbid, an umbrella). Put it in a lovely clean glass and it’ll show itself off just fine. It should impress those who like both strong and distinctive flavour as well as beauty in a drink, just remember that long shake! (Yes the Gin will bruise. That’s fine, it works.)

In terms of Gin choice make sure it’s not too brash if you don’t know the persons favorite brand. I’d recommend Plymouth for most people because even I can drink that straight. It’s the main ingredient and will totally alter the entire affair. Essentially, if you enjoy any brand in a Gin and tonic it should be fine here. I believe that’s the official rule, it’s certainly mine. Enjoy!

The Filmograph Cocktail

That’s a pretty damn good name.

image

This is about as forgotten as they get, you won’t find this in an average bar… Why? Well the answer lies in the recipe…

Recipe

2 fl oz Brandy

¾ fl oz lemon syrup (Use lemon juice though, unless you like your drinks to taste of coconut icing).

½ fl oz kola tonic

“So… What the hell is Kola Tonic?”

That question is the reason nobody knows about this drink (that and the fact the original recipe was WAY too sweet, hence why I suggest lemon juice instead of Lemon syrup). Barely anyone knows what Kola tonic is, can I blame them? No. But this ignorance is the reason this  beautifully named drink has been consigned to oblivion… A shame isn’t it? 

Kola tonic is basically a syrup designed to taste like a cola, it really is that simple. It’s quite easy to find online, as it’s a staple of african drinking. Interestingly there used to be an alcoholic version of it called Tonicola, which is sadly no longer produced at all. Anyway, with proper lemon juice to add a bit of tartness this drink is sublime, it’s one I’ll make at home quite regularly. Hell, don’t expect most bars to be able to give you this. Although if they can it means they really know what they’re doing.